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Tastes of Texas: BBQ
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Tastes of Texas: BBQ

When you think of Texas, do you think BBQ? Well, now I do!!

Texas BBQ is more than food, it’s a lifestyle; it’s not just a recipe for brisket, it’s folklore. Barbecue tradition has passed down through generations and each region of Texas has its own story. Some Texans spend weekends devoted to meat. BBQ is celebratory and a big part of Texan pride. People line up early in the morning at their favorite joints just to get a piece of the BBQ pie. Why? Well, read on, y’all!

So what is barbecue? Barbecue is a special preparation of meat

Beignet, Done That!!
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Beignet, Done That!!

Let’s get one thing straight before we begin: it’s pronounced “ben-YAY.”

Okay, we may start.

So, the word beignet actually comes from the Celtic word bigne which means “to raise.” The word also derives from the Spanish for fritters, buelos, but ultimately, the French word for fritters (beignet, of course) stuck for the long haul. Truly, all of the influences go hand and hand.

These Louisiana specialties are fried, raised pieces of dough that make for an excellent treat. After the dough is fried, the squares of yumminess are sprinkled with powdered sugar, and the result is …

Cajun vs. Creole: What’s the Difference?
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Cajun vs. Creole: What’s the Difference?

First lesson when comparing Cajun and Creole cuisines? They are not the same.

Contrary to popular belief, Cajun and Creole cuisines are not the same thing. The names may have become synonymous and interchangeable with each other and Louisiana cooking–but true Southerners know what’s up.

Second lesson when comparing Cajun and Creole cuisines? Tomatoes make all the difference.

Creole cuisine uses tomatoes and true Cajun cookin’ does not. The end. No, I’m just kidding. But, really, how can you tell one gumbo from the other? The use of a red, round veggie. (Or is it a fruit…?) But the

Tastes of Texas: Tex Mex
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Tastes of Texas: Tex Mex

Tex Mex, you know it, you love it, but where did it come from? I’ve got answers. Let me give you the short lowdown on some Tex Mex history.

So, Tex Mex didn’t start as a cuisine: it started as a train. The Texas-Mexican Railway came first in 1875. Tex Mex started as the train’s abbreviation but ended up describing the people of Mexican descent who were born in Texas.

“Tex Mex” as a culture has existed for hundreds of years: it began during the mission era when Spanish and Mexican foods mixed with Anglo fare. But, Tex Mex the